job: Organizer, Bangor, ME

colist at comm-org.wisc.edu colist at comm-org.wisc.edu
Wed Oct 5 09:26:42 CDT 2005


[ed:  this job post includes salary info.]

From: Matt Schlobohm <matt at mainefairtrade.org>


----- Forwarded message from Jack McKay <jack at gbaclc.org> -----

Please forward:

Job opportunity at
Food AND Medicine

The job would entail organizing and building community support for 
worker rights.

This project is scheduled to run for six months, but may go longer.  The 
pay is
approximately $14-$15 an hour.  

For background information on Food AND Medicine, please see below
For more information please contact Jack McKay at 989-4141.  

Please send resumees to 20 Ivers Street, Brewer, ME 04412.

     
      

Brief history Food AND Medicine
 

Big Picture:

 

In America today, the "little guy" is increasingly given the raw deal.  
The rich
are getting richer and the poor, poorer.  Our jobs are going overseas, 
tax cuts
are being handed out to the rich, our public services are being given to big
corporations.  

 

The "Wal-Martization" of the economy has meant that it is harder for 
workers,
farmers and small business owners to get by.  Large corporations like 
DHL and
Wal-Mart have the power to pit workers, communities and even countries 
against
each other.  In this economy, we are told that the customer is king, but 
we are
also producers- selling our labor, our farm products or running a small
business.  And as producers we are being squeezed by the corporate 
goliaths.
For producers, the "Wal-Martization" of the economy has meant unemployment,
low-paying jobs, farms and small businesses going under.

 

 

Food AND Medicine's role:
 

Food AND Medicine stands up for the "little guy" through sticking together.
FAM's organization approach says 1) in the richest country in world, 
everyone
deserves basic needs met, like food, medicine, housing, etc.  2)  that 
we have
to give voice to working people.  3)  that we should include those effected-
laid off workers, farmers, small business.  

 

 

FAM's Background:

A group of laid-off workers, union members and community activists first 
met in
the late fall of 2001 when over 1,000 workers in the Bangor area had 
just been
laid off due to "free trade."[1] FAM has chosen certain strategic 
fights, that
would make a big difference for many people

 

2001:   Successful fight for healthcare

·        The first major fight for FAM was taking Maine Senator's Snowe and
Collins to task for supporting help to airline companies and not airline
workers.  We engaged in a high profile public fight that turned into a 
running
battle over Trade Promotion Authority.  We marched on their offices, 
held press
conferences, raided their press conferences and ultimately publicly 
shamed them
into changing their position so that they voted for healthcare support 
for laid
off workers.

·        FAM helped organize the second annual July 4th Solidarity 
Celebration.

 

 

2002:  Video and voice of workers hurt by free trade- Congressman Mike 
Michaud
elected

 

·        FAM produced a video with testimony from workers who had lost their
jobs due to free trade.  

·        FAM also joined with the National AFL-CIO and the Bangor CLC to 
help
organize a caravan of workers who had lost their jobs to make a high-profile
trip across the state.  

·        FAM very publicly highlighted the issue of free trade, which 
was widely
considered a determining factor in the election of union member and 
paperworker
Mike Michaud to the U.S. Congress.

 

2003:   Aid to mills in Millinocket, our newspaper, award winning mural and
Solidarity Harvest

 

·        In 2003, two mills employing over 1,000 workers were shut down just
north of Bangor. FAM launched solidarity efforts that helped raised over 
$7,000
for the workers.  FAM also gave technical support to help the workers 
re-build
their Central Labor Council.

·        FAM launched Solidarity News a newspaper of and for workers in the
Penobscot River region.  The newspaper has grown into a regular, quarterly
publication and now distributes 5,000 free copies.

·        FAM also helped to organize over 1000 people to participate in 
creating
and painting a 600 square foot mural on the outside of the GBA-CLC Union 
Hall in
Brewer, telling the story of unions in Maine.  This mural later won a 
cash prize
and has been featured on the Haymarket Foundation's calendar.

·        FAM helped support the Bangor CLC at its July 4th Solidarity Event,
which raised over $6,000 for laid off workers.  FAM then organized its first
Solidarity Harvest, which gave Thanksgiving meals to over 130 families.  
This
effort gained great publicity for unions and the power of mutual aid and
support.  FAM is now in its third year of the Solidarity Harvest.

 

 

2004:   Ground breaking bill on trade, Union Supported Agriculture and 
election
issues

 

·        FAM played a key role in organizing worker and legislative 
support for
the Maine Jobs, Trade and Democracy Act, which has become a model for state
legislation on trade (see the AFL-CIO Website).

·        FAM helped organize the 4th annual July 4th Solidarity Celebration,
which featured President Tom Buffenbarger.

·        FAM organized the first year of the Union Supported Agriculture 
(USA)
project, which brings unions and farms together for mutual support.  The 
program
is now in its second season and has received national recognition as a 
model for
innovative approaches to supporting farms and increasing working family 
power.

·        For the election, FAM helped organize three very public actions
involving laid off workers.  One was an unemployment line, which stretched a
long block in downtown Bangor and gained statewide public attention.  
The other
was the ""Cemetery of Jobs" action, where we made 75 signs and arranged them
cemetery style in the front lawn of a closed factory.  We also did another
action in front of a closed plant when George Bush came to Bangor.

 

2005:   Moved Senators on CAFTA, Solidarity for DHL, launched the Farmer 
Labor
Small Business Alliance

 

·        FAM played an important role in helping to push Sen. Snowe and 
Collins
into opposing CAFTA.  

·        FAM organized laid off workers to become active with public policy
concerning our social safety net, in particular health insurance, 
unemployment
insurance and dislocated worker re-training.  FAM has organized laid off 
worker
meetings with State Legislators from Penobscot, Hancock and Waldo country,
meeting with Congressman Mike Michaud and public actions geared toward 
gaining
media coverage of the inadequacy of our social safety net in America today.

·        FAM organized small business and farmer support for 23 workers 
at DHL
who were fired during a Teamster organizing campaign.  FAM also featured the
issues in its paper, Solidarity News.  Using its standing and 
credibility in the
community, FAM helped move the community to back the workers and stand 
against
management.  The workers won.

·        On our 5th July 4th Solidarity Celebration, FAM officially 
launched the
Farmer Labor Small Business (FLSB) Alliance.  The FLSB is a means to bring
different groups together that share fundamental interests.  We are both
producers and consumers.  As consumers we have great potential power.  
The FLSB
is a way to direct that power for working families.

 

Other ongoing programs:

 

Direct support to laid off workers:  FAM has organized the raising of over
$50,000 to workers who have had their jobs outsourced.  At each event, 
we hold
press conferences and actions, which explain how free trade is bad, our 
social
safety net has holes, but our unions fight for justice and care for working
families.  These actions have made FAM a credible organization in our 
community.

 

Food Bank.  FAM has overseen the financial support of a food bank at the 
Union
Hall in Brewer for over two years.  For the past two summers, this has 
included
fresh organic vegetables purchased by local unions and donated to the 
food bank.
 The food bank has developed into a place where laid off workers keep their
community together and share stories and develop ways to address the 
problems of
being laid off in today's America.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[1]  One lead member of this group was Pat McCoy, Secretary - Treasurer 
of IAM
Local 2732 (International Paper Costigan), which was shut down by IP.  IAM
Representative Dave Lowell also played a key role in the formation of 
Food AND
Medicine.  Later on, IAM Local 1821 played a crucial role as President 
Kendal
Dunbar (and his wife Patti Dunbar) are an important leaders in FAM.

Jack McKay, President
Greater Bangor Area Central Labor Council (GBA-CLC), AFL-CIO
20 Ivers Street
Brewer, ME 04412
207-989-4141
www.gbaclc.org

----- End forwarded message -----


-- Matt Schlobohm, coordinator Maine Fair Trade Campaign 217 South 
Mountain Rd. Greene, ME 04236 PH: (207) 777-6387 FAX: (207) 783-5096 
www.mainefairtrade.org



Please forward:

Job opportunity at
Food AND Medicine

The job would entail organizing and building community support for 
worker rights.

This project is scheduled to run for six months, but may go longer.  The 
pay is approximately $14-$15 an hour.  

For background information on Food AND Medicine, please see below
For more information please contact Jack McKay at 989-4141.  

Please send resumees to 20 Ivers Street, Brewer, ME 04412.

     
      

Brief history Food AND Medicine
 

Big Picture:

 

In America today, the "little guy" is increasingly given the raw deal.  
The rich are getting richer and the poor, poorer.  Our jobs are going 
overseas, tax cuts are being handed out to the rich, our public services 
are being given to big corporations.  

 

The "Wal-Martization" of the economy has meant that it is harder for 
workers, farmers and small business owners to get by.  Large 
corporations like DHL and Wal-Mart have the power to pit workers, 
communities and even countries against each other.  In this economy, we 
are told that the customer is king, but we are also producers- selling 
our labor, our farm products or running a small business.  And as 
producers we are being squeezed by the corporate goliaths.  For 
producers, the "Wal-Martization" of the economy has meant unemployment, 
low-paying jobs, farms and small businesses going under.

 

 

Food AND Medicine's role:
 

Food AND Medicine stands up for the "little guy" through sticking 
together.  FAM's organization approach says 1) in the richest country in 
world, everyone deserves basic needs met, like food, medicine, housing, 
etc.  2)  that we have to give voice to working people.  3)  that we 
should include those effected- laid off workers, farmers, small business.  

 

 

FAM's Background:

A group of laid-off workers, union members and community activists first 
met in the late fall of 2001 when over 1,000 workers in the Bangor area 
had just been laid off due to "free trade."[1] FAM has chosen certain 
strategic fights, that would make a big difference for many people

 

2001:   Successful fight for healthcare

·        The first major fight for FAM was taking Maine Senator's Snowe 
and Collins to task for supporting help to airline companies and not 
airline workers.  We engaged in a high profile public fight that turned 
into a running battle over Trade Promotion Authority.  We marched on 
their offices, held press conferences, raided their press conferences 
and ultimately publicly shamed them into changing their position so that 
they voted for healthcare support for laid off workers.

·        FAM helped organize the second annual July 4th Solidarity 
Celebration.

 

 

2002:  Video and voice of workers hurt by free trade- Congressman Mike 
Michaud elected

 

·        FAM produced a video with testimony from workers who had lost 
their jobs due to free trade.  

·        FAM also joined with the National AFL-CIO and the Bangor CLC to 
help organize a caravan of workers who had lost their jobs to make a 
high-profile trip across the state.  

·        FAM very publicly highlighted the issue of free trade, which 
was widely considered a determining factor in the election of union 
member and paperworker Mike Michaud to the U.S. Congress.

 

2003:   Aid to mills in Millinocket, our newspaper, award winning mural 
and Solidarity Harvest

 

·        In 2003, two mills employing over 1,000 workers were shut down 
just north of Bangor. FAM launched solidarity efforts that helped raised 
over $7,000 for the workers.  FAM also gave technical support to help 
the workers re-build their Central Labor Council.

·        FAM launched Solidarity News a newspaper of and for workers in 
the Penobscot River region.  The newspaper has grown into a regular, 
quarterly publication and now distributes 5,000 free copies.

·        FAM also helped to organize over 1000 people to participate in 
creating and painting a 600 square foot mural on the outside of the 
GBA-CLC Union Hall in Brewer, telling the story of unions in Maine.  
This mural later won a cash prize and has been featured on the Haymarket 
Foundation's calendar.

·        FAM helped support the Bangor CLC at its July 4th Solidarity 
Event, which raised over $6,000 for laid off workers.  FAM then 
organized its first Solidarity Harvest, which gave Thanksgiving meals to 
over 130 families.  This effort gained great publicity for unions and 
the power of mutual aid and support.  FAM is now in its third year of 
the Solidarity Harvest.

 

 

2004:   Ground breaking bill on trade, Union Supported Agriculture and 
election issues

 

·        FAM played a key role in organizing worker and legislative 
support for the Maine Jobs, Trade and Democracy Act, which has become a 
model for state legislation on trade (see the AFL-CIO Website).

·        FAM helped organize the 4th annual July 4th Solidarity 
Celebration, which featured President Tom Buffenbarger.

·        FAM organized the first year of the Union Supported Agriculture 
(USA) project, which brings unions and farms together for mutual 
support.  The program is now in its second season and has received 
national recognition as a model for innovative approaches to supporting 
farms and increasing working family power.

·        For the election, FAM helped organize three very public actions 
involving laid off workers.  One was an unemployment line, which 
stretched a long block in downtown Bangor and gained statewide public 
attention.  The other was the ""Cemetery of Jobs" action, where we made 
75 signs and arranged them cemetery style in the front lawn of a closed 
factory.  We also did another action in front of a closed plant when 
George Bush came to Bangor.

 

2005:   Moved Senators on CAFTA, Solidarity for DHL, launched the Farmer 
Labor Small Business Alliance

 

·        FAM played an important role in helping to push Sen. Snowe and 
Collins into opposing CAFTA.  

·        FAM organized laid off workers to become active with public 
policy concerning our social safety net, in particular health insurance, 
unemployment insurance and dislocated worker re-training.  FAM has 
organized laid off worker meetings with State Legislators from 
Penobscot, Hancock and Waldo country, meeting with Congressman Mike 
Michaud and public actions geared toward gaining media coverage of the 
inadequacy of our social safety net in America today.

·        FAM organized small business and farmer support for 23 workers 
at DHL who were fired during a Teamster organizing campaign.  FAM also 
featured the issues in its paper, Solidarity News.  Using its standing 
and credibility in the community, FAM helped move the community to back 
the workers and stand against management.  The workers won.

·        On our 5th July 4th Solidarity Celebration, FAM officially 
launched the Farmer Labor Small Business (FLSB) Alliance.  The FLSB is a 
means to bring different groups together that share fundamental 
interests.  We are both producers and consumers.  As consumers we have 
great potential power.  The FLSB is a way to direct that power for 
working families.

 

Other ongoing programs:

 

Direct support to laid off workers:  FAM has organized the raising of 
over $50,000 to workers who have had their jobs outsourced.  At each 
event, we hold press conferences and actions, which explain how free 
trade is bad, our social safety net has holes, but our unions fight for 
justice and care for working families.  These actions have made FAM a 
credible organization in our community.

 

Food Bank.  FAM has overseen the financial support of a food bank at the 
Union Hall in Brewer for over two years.  For the past two summers, this 
has included fresh organic vegetables purchased by local unions and 
donated to the food bank.  The food bank has developed into a place 
where laid off workers keep their community together and share stories 
and develop ways to address the problems of being laid off in today's 
America.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[1]  One lead member of this group was Pat McCoy, Secretary - Treasurer 
of IAM Local 2732 (International Paper Costigan), which was shut down by 
IP.  IAM Representative Dave Lowell also played a key role in the 
formation of Food AND Medicine.  Later on, IAM Local 1821 played a 
crucial role as President Kendal Dunbar (and his wife Patti Dunbar) are 
an important leaders in FAM.

Jack McKay, President
Greater Bangor Area Central Labor Council (GBA-CLC), AFL-CIO
20 Ivers Street
Brewer, ME 04412
207-989-4141
www.gbaclc.org







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