CED works latest issue

colist-admin at comm-org.utoledo.edu colist-admin at comm-org.utoledo.edu
Sat May 19 09:49:17 CDT 2001


From: Don McNair <mcnair at junction.net>

The Spring 2001 issue of “Making Waves: Canada’s Community Economic
Development Magazine” is a special edition on the gap that has grown
between the Co-operative and CED movements, and how they might once again
integrate their efforts. For more information, visit www.cedworks.com and
select “Making Waves” on the menu bar. Apologies for cross-postings.

CONTENTS

CO-OPS & CED
To re-integrate the co-operative and CED movements, make a start where the
two intersect: the “community businesses“ that are commercially viable, but
ultimately seek to empower people and improve a community’s quality of life.

REDISCOVERING & REDEFINING “CO-OPERATION”
The scale of operations which global commerce deems competitive is liable
to make co-operatives as rootless as any investor-focussed company. We
require bold leadership that keeps the interests of all stakeholders, the
membership especially, in the forefront.

THE CED ORCHESTRA
Effective CED requires different instruments  private sector, government,
social economy  playing in harmony. How is this to be achieved in the new
century, when both economic development and communities will defy geography?

ON THE REBOUND
The co-ops emerging in B.C.’s resource sector are not just local efforts to
shore up the jobs lost to corporate forestry and fisheries. Co-operators
are integrating value-added businesses into an alternative, community-based
system of production.

CO-OPS, THE SOCIAL ECONOMY, & CED IN QUÉBEC
A “symbiotic” relationship between the co-op and CED movements may take
hold in Québec, built on a mutual commitment to democratic organization and
to community-wide empowerment. But CED practitioners must be ready to take
the lead.

RURAL REVITALIZATION IN NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR
Although they are in urgent need of economic innovation, the fishing ports
off the north Atlantic may not be ready for co-operatives. So the co-op
federation is expanding its range of services and partners to assist
microentrepreneurs.

CED - A GROWTH STRATEGY FOR CREDIT UNIONS
Distinctive profile; new markets; the risks inherent in unconventional
investment mitigated by community capacity and engagement - a credit union
manager argues that CED is just good business.

FULL CIRCLE
Whereas Canadian practitioners of CED once applied internationally what
they had learned at home, the cumulative experience of developing
co-operatives overseas has much to “teach the teachers.“

WORKER CO-OPS  ONE TOOL AMONG MANY
When people are in the water, throw them a life-ring, not a helicopter.
Good CED practice demands recognizing the prerequisites built into
different business structures.

WOMEN, CO-OPS, & CED
How best can women transform their affinity for co-operatism into viable,
empowering enterprises? A CED practitioner has some insights.

NEW GENERATION CO-OPERATIVES
Their exclusiveness puts them at odds with some co-operators and CED
activists. NGCs are nevertheless an effective instrument of rural
revitalization, when housed within a CED strategy.

ALTERNATIVES FOR PUBLIC SECTOR REFORM
Local, non-governmental contractors may well outperform the bureaucrats in
service delivery  assuming communities have social capital adequate to the
job. What kind of business offers efficiency and accountability, while
building civic engagement and capacity? The co-op.

VALUES AT RISK
Scale is a dilemma for Mondragon and any other enterprise that is supposed
to make both net revenue and people thrive. What’s worse? If scale should
cease to be a dilemma.


Don McNair
The CED Bookshop/Making Waves magazine
Centre for Community Enterprise
2905-31st Street, Suite 5, Vernon, B.C. V1T 5H6 Canada
(tel) 250-542-7057 (fax) 250-542-7229 (e-mail) mcnair at junction.net
On-line bookshop -  http://www.cedworks.com





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